Education Research

An ongoing current archive of links and resources highlighting news concerning research in regards to education and family values.

      
 Title   Date   Author   Host 

naturalnews.com

by Mike Adams

March 1, 2015

A WhiteHouse.gov petition calling for the prohibition of laws requiring mandatory vaccines has been throttled by the White House, buried from public view and finally frozen for over 36 hours to prevent the petition from achieving 100,000 signatures.

The petition, which was rapidly headed toward the 100,000 signatures needed to trigger a response from the White House, was frozen mid-day Friday and has remained stuck at 56,791 signatures for over 36 hours.

breakingisraelnews.com

by Ahuva Balofsky

August 10, 2014

The recent outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa is making headlines around the world, and generating a fair bit of international concern.

The deadly virus has claimed over 800 lives since March in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea and Nigeria, and is fatal in up to 90 percent of cases. Israeli researcher Dr. Leslie Lobel, however, is not sitting idly by. He has been studying the disease for many years and believes he is close to developing a cure. Ebola was first identified in 1976 in Zaire (now the Democratic Republic of Congo). It starts off looking like a bad flu, but quickly progresses to vomiting, diarrhoea, rash, impaired kidney and liver function, and in some cases, both internal and external bleeding, according to the World Health Organization.

naturalnews.com

by Jonathan Benson

July 30, 2014

The basic human rights protections established by the Nuremberg Code, which was adopted immediately after the end of World War II, continue to serve as a global template for how human beings are to be treated by the scientific community.

But the modern equivalent of the Holocaust is now taking form under the guise of feeding the world and saving the planet, with Monsanto and others in the biotech industry routinely testing their chemicals and faux foods on the public without informed consent, just like amoral scientists did in the death camps. As far as medical experiments go, every individual has the right under the Code to consent, or not, to being used in scientific trials or tests that involve toying around with new or unusual substances. This constitutes the essence of the Code, which expressly prohibits human experimentation unless the person being experimented on first gives his or her permission, with full disclosure of any potential adverse events.

orbitmedia.com

by Andy Crestodina

July 29, 2014

Here are guidelines for length for ten types of content. Most of these are compiled from studies that analyzed the high-performers.

"It depends." What a totally unsatisfying answer. Of course it depends. But there are rules of thumb. There is research. We can analyze what works and draw conclusions. We can create guidelines, especially for things that are measurable. Like length.

reuters.com

by Caroline Stauffer

July 28, 2014

Genetically modified corn seeds are no longer protecting Brazilian farmers from voracious tropical bugs, increasing costs as producers turn to pesticides, a farm group said on Monday.

Producers want four major manufacturers of so-called BT corn seeds to reimburse them for the cost of spraying up to three coats of pesticides this year, said Ricardo Tomczyk, president of Aprosoja farm lobby in Mato Grosso state. "The caterpillars should die if they eat the corn, but since they didn't die this year producers had to spend on average 120 reais ($54) per hectare ... at a time that corn prices are terrible," he said.

dcclothesline.com

by Dave Hodges

July 26, 2014

Why won't America stand up for herself? Why is the country, once a country which possessed courage and conviction sitting idly by and allowing itself to be taken to the slaughter without so much as a whimper?

The answer to the above question lies in the psychological concept known as Learned Helplessness as discovered by Martin Seligman. "Learned helplessness occurs when an animal is repeatedly subjected to an aversive stimulus that it cannot escape. Eventually, the animal will stop trying to avoid the stimulus and behave as if it is utterly helpless to change the situation. Even when opportunities to escape are presented, this learned helplessness will prevent any action."

dcclothesline.com

by Mac Slavo

July 26, 2014

Traditional history suggests that dinosaurs and humans never crossed paths because their existence on earth was separated by tens of millions of years.

But a new discovery by scientist Mark Armitage of California State University may well turn the history of human civilization upside down. Armitage was recently on a dig in Montana when he came across the largest triceratops horn ever unearthed. Upon further examination of the unique specimen with a high-powered microscope Armitage discovered something that no scientist had ever seen on a dinosaur sample before - soft tissue. When he published his findings his colleagues were stunned, because the existence of soft tissue, which should degrade and disappear over millions of years, suggests that dinosaurs didn't go extinct 60 million years ago, but rather, were alive and well in North America just several thousand years ago.

townhall.com

by Calvin Beisner

July 23, 2014

In his recent article "The Threat to the Scientific Method," Dr. Patrick Michaels, a climatologist who for 30 years was Research Professor of Environmental Sciences at the University of Virginia and now directs the Center for the Study of Science at the Cato Institute, pointed to a serious problem: the corruption of science through government (and sometimes industry) funding, which has led to rapidly and alarmingly increasing numbers of retracted journal articles. In light of that trend, he asks, "If we can no longer trust science, what do we have as the basis for knowledge?"

themetapicture.com

July 22, 2014

A famous restaurant in NYC decided to hire a firm to figure out why they kept getting bad reviews. What this firm discovered is quite interesting.

"We are a popular restaurant for both locals and tourists alike. Having been in business for many years, we noticed that although the number of customers we serve on a daily basis is almost the same today as it was 10 years ago, the service just seems super slow even thought we added more staff and cut back on the menu items...

reason.com

by Robby Soave

July 22, 2014

A just-released study from the University of Arkansas provides a substantial endorsement of charter school education. U.S. students who spent several years in charter schools were found to score significantly better on tests and make more money than their counterparts in traditional K-12 public schools, when adjusted for funding discrepancies. Researchers examined data from 21 different states. While the results varied, charter schools were found to be more productive-and generate a higher return on investment-than traditional public schools (TPS). On average, charter school students scored so much better on assessments that spending money on charters was roughly 40 percent more efficient than spending money on TPS.